Dry Potassium Fertilizer from Banana Peels



I’ve been looking for ways to use what I’ve got here to fertilize my gardens. Oh, I know that I could go to the store and buy ready-made fertilizers, and sometimes I do. However, I believe that on our farm, we have more fertilizers than I can shake a stick at, and I’m determined to figure out how to use them all to feed my gardens.

Dry Potassium Fertilizer from Banana Peels - Stone Family Farmstead

A few weeks ago, I shared information about the nutrient value of banana peels along with a recipe for a banana peel fertilizer liquid that I began using for some of my potassium-loving plants. I like it, and it’s nice to use when your plants need watering along with the fertilizer.

Recently, I put my whole garden on a timer, so now there’s a watering schedule that is controlled by a timer at the spicket, versus having my poor garden dependent on me to make sure water gets on the soil around the plants a few times per week. The plants no longer need me to water them, so I wanted to try a different approach at getting potassium into the soil for those plants.

How I Made My Dry Potassium Fertilizer from Banana Peels

First I started with some bananas. My family goes through bananas like nobody’s business for the most part, so I always have enough banana peels to take outside to my handy-dandy electricity-free herb dehydrator. I leave them in there a few days until they are black and brittle.

Drying Banana Peels - Stone Family Farmstead

Drying Banana Peels - Stone Family Farmstead

This is what they look like after they are dried. I forgot to take the stickers off, but I’m glad because it reminds me to tell you that if you are putting this fertilizer into your organic vegetable garden, you’ll want to make sure you are buying organic bananas for this project. If you aren’t specifically organic in your gardening, then it’s no worries. There is still plenty of lovely potassium to be had in non-organic peels.

Dried Organic Banana Peels for Fertilizer - Stone Family Farmstead

Next, I bring them indoors and cut them with my kitchen shears into half- to one-inch squares–small enough for my bullet blender to handle. I whirl them around until they are almost the consistency of coarse pepper. There are still a few little stringy bits in there, but that’s alright, just so most of it is ground up.

Blending up banana peels - Stone Family Farmstead

Each dried banana peel makes 1-2 Tbsp. of fertilizer, depending on the size. Many people will bury a banana peel near the roots of a potassium-loving plant, so I think it’s safe to say that 1-2 Tbsp. of this fertilizer will do the trick. Use as often as you would use any other fertilizer, but since this one is mostly potassium, you will want to find out if the plant you are fertilizing has any nitrogen or phosphorus needs as well, and fertilize accordingly.

Do you make any of your own garden fertilizers?

Shared at Good Morning Mondays, Make Your House Sing Monday, The Art of Homemaking Mondays, Hey Momma Linky Party, MisAdventures Monday, Tuesdays with a Twist, Tuesday Garden Party, Maple Hill Hop>, Dream. Create. Inspire. Link. Party, Homestead Blog Hop, Wildcrafting Wednesday, Our Simple Homestead Blog Hop, Green Thumb Thursday, Weekend Blog Hop, Front Porch Friday, Awesome Life Friday, Simple Saturdays, Simply Natural Saturday



 
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Kristi Stone

Kristi Stone

Honestly? I'm the author of this blog...sometimes. My family and I live in Sunny Southern California on a one acre hobby farm where we are working diligently to one day produce our dairy, eggs, and produce. That takes A LOT of work, so if you don't hear from me as soon as you'd like, give me a shout out in the comments and I'll chat back as soon as I can between the garden, goat kids, chickens, husband, human kids, and playing with my grandboy, Kieran. And in the mean time, if you'd like to see more frequently what goes on at our farm, please feel free to join my Facebook group (see the right column) where I am more active. I'd love to get to know you! 🙂
Kristi Stone

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Comments

  1. I just make the tea fertilizer everything else get directly added to the soil. Love this though I may have to give it a try. I could dry them in the garden pretty quick as the temps are spiking here. Great idea!

    • It’s so easy to make and with the heat we have in the summer, the peels dry pretty quickly. What I really like about the dry version of this fertilizer is that it will keep much longer than the wet version. It’s just easy. I hope it works for you!

  2. Great idea! I like how you are using things from your own household to add back to the garden. Thank you for joining us this week on The Maple Hill Hop!

  3. What a great idea. It’s the most organic form you can have! #heymomma

  4. Your posts are so interesting!! I am an amateur vegetable gardener and these things are way beyond my scope, but I am learning so much from you!! Thank you!! And thanks so much for linking up with #heymomma! Hope you come by again on Monday! :))

    • Thank you, Casey! You know, I’ve been gardening for over 10 years and I STILL feel like an amateur vegetable gardener! I’m glad you are learning something from my posts, though, that makes me feel good to know. 🙂

      I’ll definitely be there on Monday, btw! 🙂

  5. Congrats! You had the most viewed post on the (mis)Adventures Mondays Blog Hop last week and will be this week’s feature! Thank you so much for sharing. I can’t wait to see what you bring this week.

  6. What a smart idea! saw you on the link party and thought this was so cool. I grew up on a farm and my father used rotten apples mixed with something for fertilizer, it smelled awful…lol
    Thanks
    Maria
    http://www.simplenaturedecorblog.com

  7. I like using every thing I can from the kitchen in the garden.

    Thanks for linking up at the Homestead Blog Hop. Hope to see you again this week.

    • I know! I have read your blog before and noticed that you are into that too. It’s great to be able to use our trash to accomplish goals and benefit our homestead even further.

  8. Another great post! I just got rid of a bunch of banana peels, but not any more…you’ve convinced me to re-purpose them. Thanks for stopping by Front Porch Friday, we’re featuring your post this week.

  9. Hey Kristi! I love how you’re drying them out to preserve them for long term use, awesome! I might just go dumpster dive 100 bunches and use this to stock up on potassium LOL. I’ve always just added the peals and let the worms do the break down work, but I love this method. Nice one!

  10. What a great idea! I have some of your banana peel fertilizer brewing right now…I’ll have to try this next!

    Thanks for linking up with Green Thumb Thursday. I hope to see you back this week!

    Lisa

  11. Hi I was wondering do the peels stink after there dried? I gotta know as I can’t do the wet version as bananas are the most disgusting smell on God’s green earth…in other words if they smell after being dried I gotta not take this on as I will hurl if they still smell of bananas. Thanks

  12. Hi Kristi, I like your idea.As i live in india i can dry peels easely.I will try it.

  13. Thank you foг any other informative web site. Where elѕe maү I am getting
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    method? I’ve a missіon that I’m simply now running on, and I’ve been on the
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